Addictive Trading

Back to Article
Back to Article

Addictive Trading

(Andrew Galster/LHS Peak Press)

(Andrew Galster/LHS Peak Press)

(Andrew Galster/LHS Peak Press)

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






39 states have a strong ban on this strong addiction, and yet kids under 12 are doing it. Gambling  has been a common pastime for the richest of the rich, to the dirt poor, coming with a promise of unforeseen riches, if your feeling lucky. Due to this, gambling has become a serious problem, with hundreds of addicts selling their lives just to see if if they get the luck of the cards.

 

Games like the infamous 2k series, and “Counter Strike: Global Offensive”, better known as “CSGO”,  are in hot water with lots of people. The range of people who have issues with games like these go from disgruntled parents to government officials in the Netherlands. The issue that is having such a negative impact among so many people is gambling in video games. Gambling, according to Webster’s dictionary “To play a game for money or property.” In many modern video games you can use real life currency to purchase in-game items. These items include cosmetics, which are items that change the look of your character or equipment but don’t change game play, and buff or boosts, that are essentially ways to pay to make yourself better at the game. “You should earn what you get.” exclaimed a disgruntled player. “I don’t think that should be allowed.” So when you are essentially spinning a wheel to get items in-game that make you better, it starts to make sense why people are so upset. These buffs you gamble on are not the only issue in popular games. “CSGO” after 7 years still has an average of over 300 thousand players daily. With no boost anywhere in the game you might be wondering what the issue is. Gambling sites and scams plague the internet selling and buying cosmetics. The most expensive “CSGO” cosmetic item to date sells for around 1300 US dollars minimum. “That is stupid, idiotic.”

 

So, people are already buying boosts strait up with money out of their pockets, but it gets deeper than that. A popular theme in these games are a thing call “loot crates,” or whatever colonialism a game wants to use. These things are randomized boxes that you buy to open, to see if you can get good items slash boosts. Things get more complicated when you realize that some games let you increase your chances of winning by buying upgrades. That’s like taking a slot machine, and rigging it to only get you 777. It is literally cheating. Sad thing is, this is commonplace in games.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email